An analysis of the wild duck by henrik ibsen

Analysis and criticism[ edit ] Guided by a fervent strain of idealism, Gregers endeavors to reveal the truth to Hjalmar, and thereby free him from the mendacity which surrounds him. Relling has given him the usual one: Thus The Wild Duck represents a personal compromise for Ibsen.

He finds that the shot has penetrated her breastbone and she died immediately. Gina helps him run the business in addition to keeping house. He will be like the wild duck himself. With a pragmatic, anti-romantic viewpoint, this drama presents a continuum between the opposing values of the Ideal and the Real.

Glancing dejectedly at Hialmar Ekdal, Werle remarks to Gregers in a low voice that it would seem no one noticed that there were thirteen at the table. Gregers also recalls his father's interest in Gina; his mother revealed his betrayal to him on her deathbed.

When the skeletons are brought out of the closet, the whole dreamworld collapses; the weak husband thinks it is his duty to leave his wife, and the little girl, after trying to sacrifice her precious duck, shoots herself with the same gun overhearing the fatal words from Hjalmar: Any text you add should be original, not copied from other sources.

This has the girl losing herself in her imagination and being inspired by pictures in books. Gregers travels directly to their home from the party.

The household won the duck when Werle wounded it on a hunting expedition. However, he soon discovers his own self-deception. Upon his death, the allowance will be transferred to Hedvig for the remainder of her life. Hedvig moans that Hialmar should almost love her more if so, just like the wild duck.

The Wild Duck

When Old Ekdal emerges from his room, the family realizes he could not have fired the gun in the loft. Sorby and hopes his son will lend his approval. When the skeletons are brought out of the closet, the whole dreamworld collapses; the weak husband thinks it is his duty to leave his wife, and the little girl, after trying to sacrifice her precious duck, shoots herself with the same gun overhearing the fatal words from Hjalmar: Relling sneers at the notion, and insists that Hjalmar will be a drunk within a year.

In ensuing years, however, and as people began to understand both Ibsen's notion of "tragi-com-edy" as well as his insightful characterization, the play began to develop the fine reputation it still holds today.

Gregers insists that Hedvig did not die in vain, because her suicide unleashed a greatness within Hjalmar.

The Wild Duck Summary

Full study guide for this title currently under development. Hedvig, the innocent victim of the tension between the two men who stand for the "lie" and the "truth" has much in common with the wild duck. Gregers appears at the door. Gregers suggests that Hedvig sacrifice the precious to prove her love for her father.

Unwilling, however, to accept this pragmatic solution to life, Gregers himself becomes like the wild duck, who, when wounded, bites fast to the underwater seaweed and drowns: News arrives that Hakon is to marry Mrs.

Taking ideas and ideals from other sources, Hialmar presents an image of nobility and an appearance of character depth he does not really possess. Werle's dog retrieved it though, and despite its wounds from the shot and the dog's teeth, the Ekdals had nursed the duck back to good health.

Hakon was instrumental in the couple being married, as he had given Hjalmar a job as a photographer and a place to live. The duck was wounded by none other than Werle, whose eyesight is also failing.

Gregers notes that he does not thrive in "marsh vapors. By including many symbols in the play that refer to his personal memories, Ibsen provides further evidence that proves The Wild Duck is an outcome of his personal struggles.

After hearing a shot, the family assumes Old Ekdal is hunting in the loft, but Gregers knows he has shot the wild duck for Hedvig. He meddles in the affairs of a strange family, producing disastrous results.

Hialmar cannot live among traitors and he plans to take Ekdal with him as well. Eyeing Gina, Hialmar reluctantly stays at his desk.

The Wild Duck Characters

Werle is a rich merchant and a man of industry. Once the members of the household have retired, Relling informs Gregers that Hedvig has certainly killed herself.The Wild Duck study guide contains a biography of Henrik Ibsen, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

About The Wild Duck The Wild Duck Summary. A short summary of Henrik Ibsen's Wild Duck. This free synopsis covers all the crucial plot points of Wild Duck. From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes, the SparkNotes Wild Duck Study Guide has everything you need to ace quizzes, tests, and essays.

The duck in Ibsen's The Wild Duck is a complex symbol. This is the first play in which Henrik Ibsen used a newly innovated style of symbolism. It took critics and audiences a few years to catch on. The duck in Ibsen's The Wild Duck is a complex symbol.

This is the first play in which Henrik Ibsen used a newly innovated style of symbolism. It took critics and audiences a few years to catch on.

Analysis and discussion of characters in Henrik Ibsen's The Wild Duck.

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An analysis of the wild duck by henrik ibsen
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